Applications

Copper is one of a few elements that are essential for life. It is a part of a number of biological molecules. For example, some enzymes that are involved in respiration contain copper. Copper is both good and bad for living things. At very low concentrations, it is useful. But when the concentration increases, it becomes toxic and interferes with cell metabolism.

Copper is a reddish-colored metal, with a high electrical and thermal conductivity (silver is the only pure metal to have a higher electrical conductivity at room temperature). Pure copper's melting point is 1,981ºF (1,083ºC). The purity of copper is expressed as 4N for 99.99% pure or 7N for 99.99999% pure. The numeral gives the number of nines after the decimal point when expressed as a decimal (e.g. 4N means 0.9999, or 99.99%).

Copper is malleable and ductile, a good conductor of heat and, when very pure, a good conductor of electricity.Native copper specimen (~ 4 cm in size)

 

Native copper specimen (~ 4 cm in size) Property of     http://en.wikipedia.org

 

 

 

As the world moves into the new millenium, the need for copper is growing, rather than shrinking. Computers, like other electronics, require copper. As it was at the dawn of civilization, copper will continue to be crucial to the world's economy.

Copper Uses Today

Copper is a critical component of modern industry. In the United States, the most important use of copper is in electrical wiring. A breakdown below gives the percentage of copper used in the United States by industry:

Building Wire. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16%
Plumbing & Heating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14%
Automotive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11%
Electric Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9%
Air Conditioning & Commercial Refrigeration. . . . . . .8%
Telecommunications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7%
Factory Equipment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6%
Electronics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6%
Appliances & Extension Cords . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3%
Other. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20%
TOTAL-----------------------------------------------> 100% 

 

It is used extensively, in products such as:

Piping and tubing

Copper piping system with intumescent firestop being installed by an insulator in Vancouver, Canada.

Property of     http://en.wikipedia.org

 

 

 

Electronics

Structural Engineering

Household Products

Coinage

 

The use of copper is increasing. In the 1970s, a 1,500 square-foot house used about 280 pounds of copper. Today, a 2,200 square-foot house uses about 450 pounds of copper.

A car in the 1970s used about 35 pounds of copper. Now, 50 to 80 pounds of copper will go into one automobile.

A Boeing 727 airplane uses 9,000 pounds of copper.

 

Source: http://www.copper.org

http://en.wikipedia.org

http://resources.schoolscience.co.uk

http://www.unr.edu

 

 

In our offer we have:

            Soft copper tubes

            ● Half - hard copper tubes

            Hard copper tubes

            PVC coated copper tubes

            Copper tubes for LPG vehicles 

            Conductors, cables and wire

            PTFE seal tapes

 

Click on the links above to see more product details.

 

For information for sizes and prices please email us at info@copper-tubes.net
or telephone us on +381(0)11 3970 300

 

 

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